Top 5 Programmatic Myths-to-Bust

Myth-Busting Programmatic ’s Top 5 Biggest Misperceptions:
Targeting is now easier than ever. With the growing utilization of digital advertising and the plethora of companies offering it, the ability to leverage programmatic geo and demo targeting is at everyone’s fingertips. Despite the increase of use and availability, there are still some major misperceptions in the market: over what programmatic can and cannot do, best practices, and plain-out incorrect information. We’re taking on the top 5 biggest offenders and hoping to set the record straight.

#1. “Hyper Targeting is always the way to go”:
When we have the ability to geotarget a specific address or demographically target as granularly as ‘soccer moms’ in a specific neighborhood, the temptation is to say “heck yeah!” and go all gusto with the targeting strategy. However, there are times that broader is better.

Depending on the product or service, and the specific goals of a campaign, we often encourage our clients not to drill down too deep. The more data layers you add, the higher your CPM (cost per thousand) and the fewer the available impressions. It becomes a balancing act of cost to market penetration. Each data layer eliminates a pool of marketable individuals.

A good example is when given the option to layer in a gender demographic, unless your product or service is only used by or benefiting one gender, don’t do it – adding a gender layer effectively reduces your available reach by 50%. So, if the bigger driver is location, as within a 10-mile radius of your address, adding a layer like females in a specific age bracket, can be detrimental to a campaign.  This specific focus is only effective within a large enough geo reach: highly populated urban centers, entire states, geographic regions like the mid-Atlantic, the South East, or Pacific Coast, and alignment to the product/service needs to be strong. Sometimes we might use a data layer to shrink a market to increase share of voice, but more times than not we are looking for the most available impressions for a campaign. It’s a dance of effectiveness vs targeting, and comes with understanding of the data segmentations, which demos are drivers for a company, and which can be eliminated.

#2.“I can run targeted geo campaigns myself through Google Adwords and Facebook”:
“In general, Adwords is not difficult to use but if you don’t know how to use it correctly, you may end up losing a lot of money.” Digitalmarketingpro.net

This is why we do what we do at Enradius. Researching and negotiating, monitoring and realigning campaigns is just part of the service we offer clients. And it’s a full-time job. Here are the pluses to working with a firm over do-it-yourself:

  • Time – A professional service provider makes life that much easier, more professional, and let’s face it – more effective. And that’s one less thing on your plate.
  • Cost savings – just like filing your taxes, you can do it yourself but at what cost? What are you leaving on the table or letting leak through the cracks? A well executed plan not only drives better results but  puts the most impact behind the dollars you are spending.
  • Optimized campaigns that deliver the best results. This also falls into the time category – monitoring and re-allocating budgets, evaluating A/B campaigns and CTR, generating campaign reports, and fine tuning strategy throughout not only deliver better results but create efficiencies in defining a company best practice. Let us help you understand what works instead of taking shots in the dark.

 “…staff still need to know where to buy, what they’re buying and who they want to target for campaigns. Getting an untrained staffer to start clicking and buying is likely to result in wildly misguided advertising campaigns.” Tech Digest.  The digital landscape is constantly evolving and reinventing itself. Staying on top of and anticipating this change is what makes us an expert.

#3. “One ad fits all”:
Advertising on laptops, tablets and mobile phones have differences which may be subtle to someone not in the know, but if not set up with differences in mind, can tank an otherwise beautiful digital campaign. What we need to plan out is device optimization and cookies. Mobile ads need to be scaled, and cookies are largely ineffective on phone-based browsers. With mobile viewing on the rise, it is a factor that needs to be considered when designing ads and for overall targeting and retargeting strategies.

#4. “It’s all the same”:
Nope – some firms offering digital have access to premium channels, proprietary sites, and unique local inventory not available through anyone else. It’s pretty straight-forward stuff – think of it as a stock market – real time bidding, but instead of stocks, we’re bidding on open ad inventory on behalf of our clients. Available inventory in the ad network, pushed there by participating web publishers, with data on who is visiting their page in real time. We set a bid amount for a certain demographic and geographic target and when that lines up, our ad is pulled down from the network and is visible to the intended target. The myth here that it’s all one ad network is the challenge.  There are networks and then there are networks – we work to ensure that our clients ads are running on solid inventory, not junk inventory.

#5. “It doesn’t work for us”:
So maybe you’ve dipped your toe into digital, tried out a few Adsense campaigns or spent some budget with the local paper who said they can offer you a digital package with your ad buy. All to no avail, there was no capacity to understand the impact it had. We hear this all the time. Unsatisfied advertisers who want to step up their game, who have heard about mind-blowing digital campaigns but haven’t been able to realize it’s potential. Digital campaigns fall down when the legwork doesn’t happen up front. The targeting isn’t vetted or as in myth #1, isn’t necessary; no one is monitoring the campaign-it’s just running on auto-pilot; alignment between goals, targeting strategies and creative is out of whack; or the people selling it don’t really understand what they are selling. We have seen it all.

Given strong alignment between campaign goals, ad creative and landing-page call-to-action with conversion tracking,  with transparency and reporting  to redirect and optimize a campaign, advertisers can expect successful results.

Click Here to learn more about Enradius Targeting Capabilities and Services.

Extend your share of voice with programmatic display using behavioral targeting based on interests like:
Home and Garden – Health – Real Estate – Fashion -Jewelry – Gifts – Sporting Goods – Charitable Giving – Education – Foodies – Events –  Business and so much more.

Premium Facebook and Video marketing will add to the traffic driving to your e-commerce or brick and mortar stores helping you to reach sales goals.

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Top 7 Geotargeted Marketing Strategies for B2B (Engage me part 3)

Geotarget

Geotargeting is a great way to get your brand or services in front of the decision makers you need to reach. From the C suite to HR, middle management to small business owners – find their digital footprint. Then position your business in front of them, seamlessly, as part of their everyday online experience.

In the previous post we covered curated ads. Ads directed to a targeted profile, receptive to the message based on demographics, behavioral and geographical markers. Here we will dive into how this applies to B2B.

Your brand’s online presence is a critical component of your overall brand perception.  As mobile has overtaken desktop, and more time is spent online, more conversions happen in this space. Businesses need to have a greater presence in this conversation.  Here are strategies to leverage to drive effective B2B results with geotargeting and retargeting

  1. Find their footprints: Two great ways to find your audiences are by using Audience Insights and Lookalike Audiences.
    1. Use Audience Insights to review demographics and purchase behavior, as well as details around interests and lifestyle. This information will help you understand how to reach who currently connects with your brand. Tailor your creative and target prospects with interests and demographics based on these insights to change how they perceive your brand.
    2. Use Lookalike Audiences to find more people who look like your best customers.
  2. Some ads are better than others – Create ads that build awareness and consideration. An ad is only as “good” or effective as the quality of its composition. From how it’s written, to the images used, to making sure the call to action is functioning (no broken links!), in the digital space you have good creative options:
    1. Video – video is where it’s at. People are responding and appreciating video communications and it’s the best way to convey your “story.” Here’s our videographer’s reel samples – http://www.outerloopmedia.com/#!motion-reel/cee5 He does a great job at “capturing the essence” These are an example of long version videos which would live on the landing page, and a short 15-30 sec “clip” with a call to action would be the “ad” to entice a click through, a registration, a phone call or a memorable intention.
    2. Carousel – Leverage multiple images within a single ad experience.
    3. Link ads – A compelling image and a strong headline, a bit of descriptive info and a call to action make up a good link ad. Make sure your telling your prospects where they are linking to and what to expect when they get there. (learn more here: http://www.enradius.com/services/zip-code-targeted-advertising-products/ )
  3. Geofence actual addresses – trying to reach nurse executives? Geotarget a radius around medical campuses and around hospital systems with demographic overlays for nurses; managers. Want to engage corporate travelers? Geotarget Airports with demographic overlays for business traveler or specific industry profiles.
  4. Geofence by city or zip code – Need to reach broad regions? Added behavioral data can help you saturate a region to reach the right targets.
  5. Retarget – pixel your website and retarget visitors with ongoing marketing; Retargeting is a process in which a pixel is placed onto your website or into an outgoing email. Once a visitor comes to your site or opens your email, a cookie is placed on their computer.  This allows us to ‘re-serve’ your message to them as a way to re-engage and bring them back. A Pixel is code that instructs a website to take action.  There are actually (2) types of Pixels.  A retargeting pixel and a conversion pixel.  Ways to Retarget:
    1. Pixel Your Website
    2. Pixel placed in an out-going email
    3. Pixel placed in a video at ¼ , ½, ¾, or completion
    4. On Facebook by matching up email addresses in your database
  6. Conquest your conference – to add some zing to your typical conference exhibit – geotarget the location of your conference. Nothing like reinforcing the message of your day behind the booth with some powerful online exposure as conference goers catch up on their favorite news or entertainment back in the comfort of their hotel. And again, a week after, when they’re back at home (Yes! We can do that!)
  7. A/B test your messages; targets; and networks – validate what works. Use data to drive smart marketing decisions.

Don’t have time or the interest to do all this? Don’t panic, give us a call. We can help.

Enradius digital geotargeting and retargeting puts you in front of the business decision makers you are trying to reach. We have the expertise in developing digital strategy customized to your organizations’ goals and needs. And we practice real time monitoring of campaigns to make adjustments in order to maximize your impact. You don’t get  that from an automated platform. Try  the B2B geotargeting recommendations out for yourself or let us help you manage your digital campaigns. We’re good at it.

Curate My A _ _! That’s ADS, people. (Part two – Engage Me)

Continuing the discussion on keeping it relevant in marketing in order to engage with your target audience, and the demand in the marketplace for everything curated.

When we look across the digital market we see something for everyone – an entire universe of information, products and services. We can search for anything. A-ny-thing.

Digital has also given marketers the ability to layer data to reach individuals who most closely match ideal customers. Add to that today’s mobile environment, and we have the ability to geographically target in real time.  This is pretty exciting stuff.

What does that mean to a consumer? Ads that are meaningful to one’s interests and needs that enhance the online experience. What does that mean to a marketer? It means effective CPMs with a higher level of engagement. It’s all based on relevancy to the receiver.

In a market where everything from razors to music, news feeds, entertainment, groceries, and fashion accessories can be served up in a curated fashion, subscribed to for convenience and novelty (such as Nature Box and Amazon Pantry,) we need to think of marketing messages in the same way. No longer are marketers beholden to the red car approach to marketing. (The approach that you keep putting your ad out there in the hopes that when a person is ready to buy a new red car, that your ad then become relevant, and registers with that consumer. The same thing applies to homes, mattresses, sofas, legal services, etc.)

We’re not talking about branding, that’s a whole different conversation. We’re talking about calls to action with intent to purchase, or sign up, or engage. Products or services that meet a specific need. Some, like razors and groceries, are consumable, some like mattresses and cars, are big ticket items, and some like Netflix and Pandora are services.

Really, any product or service can benefit from a curated approach to advertising. Put your message in front of the people with whom it will most soundly resonate. This requires knowing your audience.

In the decades before digital, marketers relied on print, radio and TV which could segment audiences based on program, broad viewership or subscription base, and readership/viewership, survey-based demographics.

What’s changed is the ability to identify a viewer’s preferences across multiple categories and narrower geo-locations. So ads for a restaurant more than 30 miles away don’t muddy the online experience of an individual without a car. Or ads for a vision center don’t get lost on a person who doesn’t wear glasses.

Essentially, what we are talking about is digital ad curation. Ads that reach you based on your wants or needs, even the ones you didn’t realize you had, because of your digital profile. This is where profiling is a good thing! Ads that have meaning for the viewer, and a higher rate of engagement for the advertiser. Is it a hit all the time? Of course not, but the odds have definitely improved.

In magazines, the good ones anyway, the advertisements have long been regarded to add to the overall experience of the reader. This has been documented by many reader surveys, and part of what drives ads into this medium. We read a fashion magazine, and we pour over the ads by Calvin Klein, DKNY, and Prada. We appreciate the aesthetic and trend indicators they represent. Or the ads that offer up details about new products in skin care. For the most part the ads add to and improve the readers’ experience. This is in direct proportion to their relevancy to the readers’ interests.

Why is this? The content is specific to a topic, it’s a fashion magazine. The same principle applies to a travel magazine with ads for an exotic vacation or ads for an airline, luggage, travel guides, and resort wear. A business or news magazine will offer up corporate real estate, legal advice and banking. This is a simplified view but the advertisers who support topic specific magazines know that they are in good company within the pages to serve up information to readers who meet a defined demographic. And the readers place a value on the ads as enhancing their experience.

The more specific the topic, like bicycling or gardening, the more companies that service these interests can expect to engage with the readers. This gets more difficult to determine the broader the topics, like the news, or the weather. And it’s limiting to big brands at a national level or to some local zoned ads in the back of the book. Or complicated national ad buys across local networked (or not) publications. The same can be said pretty much for radio and TV, which generally have broader market demographics.

But in digital, and this is where it gets interesting, we not only have the very specific “readership” and “viewership” topics like fashion or sports, we have many data layers at our disposal for those who choose to play the game. We can target specific demographics of consumers as they take in the news and check the weather online as well as in topic specific websites.

It’s like being able to identify the garden magazine reader while they are reading or watching the morning news. We can take all of that topic specific targeting and apply it across the broader information sources. And through the digital ad networks, we can follow that person throughout their online experiences.

Our personal online profiles allow relevant ads to come to us in a seamless flow. Like if we are male or female. So yes fellas – this means no more feminine hygiene ads of any sort disturbing your viewership. And apartment dwellers? No lawn and garden ads required. Deliver these messages to the people who fit the user profile.

Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, has made a big show over higher priced devices that “protect” user’s data profiles. But why is that a good thing? Anonymous tracking and data that enhances what I see and experience online is a welcome application in my book. The algorithms that allow for recommended items as I shop, or drive, are also “recommending” advertisements for things in which I have an interest. This ads to my digital experience.

Why marketers should pay attention to this: It’s a natural tendency to want to tell everyone about our business or product, but not everyone cares. Put your marketing budget toward reaching people where you can best engage them. Even with PSA’s (Public Service Announcements) – leverage your impact where it can do the most good!

The current smoking cessation campaigns by the American Legacy Foundation, branded “truth”, running on tv and cable are well done and compelling if even a bit controversial, but over-reached and wasteful. They are hitting households without smokers or youth (for prevention), in prime TV networks that aren’t cheap. Don’t waste foundation money on irrelevant markets. The “truth” campaign is targeting youth, and where do teens spend the most time? On their mobile devices. With teen smoking down to just 7%, as stated on the truth website, put your ego’s away and get smart about your ad spends. (the ad campaign won an Effie award in 2005)1

40 million adult smokers, many living in southern states that are tobacco friendly, are identifiable by geography, and demographics. The CDC’s marketing approach is more effective. Geographically based and across multiple media outlets, including digital. The CDC campaign targets individuals within population sectors that are most likely to smoke, including military and individuals with behavioral health issues that make them prone to the habit. 2

For B2B companies – digital gets even better. Stay tuned as we venture into the B2B sector in the next post of this 5 part series on engagement.

As always – the basic principles of good design, strong creative, and thoughtful execution apply. An ad is only as effective as the set up. A targeted message in a poorly executed package is still a bad ad. Check the phone numbers, make sure your links work, and track it.

Let me know your thoughts on curated ads – and the movement towards digital targeted marketing. It’s a fast changing mobile market and we’re just getting started.

1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth_Initiative

2 http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-01-

Engage Me

February 9, 2016

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The key to engagement is keeping it relevant

“Engagement” is the buzz word at the top of the list this month. More than 10% of American Couples get engaged (6 million Americans plan to ask or accept a proposal) on Valentine’s Day, making it the number one day of the year for the momentous event. And for the 50 billion dollar a year wedding industry – that’s big business. But even higher on the buzz worthy list is “engagement” of a different sort. Fan engagement, employee engagement, patient engagement, political engagement – these are ever present topics across national conversations, in the news, and problem solving within the markets themselves. Engagement is what everyone is striving for.

In today’s heightened “information now” mentality, the population expects to be engaged across all sectors of the marketplace. Entertainment is on-demand, curated, and recommended; employee retention and productivity requires employees to be actively “engaged” with their work and their employers; in healthcare – patient empowerment, shared decision making, and informed consent through patient engagement are key metrics of success; the 2016 election requires party members’ support, activated grass roots efforts and debate turnouts. Across the board we’re talking about an increasing level of “engagement” from stakeholders.

So – how do we accomplish this? The key lies in making touch points relevant. Communications (ads, notifications, information) must speak directly to the issue, be interesting and visually appealing, and capture the attention of the intended target within 3 seconds or be deemed unengaging and therefore – irrelevant.

We are seeing more and more use of the term “curated” – from curated content to curated commerce2. What it boils down to is making things immediate, and relevant, for the consumer. From subscription commerce (think Dollar Shave Club and Birch Box) to Amazon’s “Recommendations for You” based on your shopping and viewing patterns, the Netflix and Xfinity on-demand entertainment models, to targeted digital ads that seem to stalk you throughout the internet reminding you of the pair of boots you abandoned in the Zappo’s shopping cart or the coffee table you lusted after on Wayfair – we are living in a customized consumer market.

Employers are encouraged to monitor the engagement of their employees in order to maximize productivity. With 71% of all employees not fully engaged, and the companies with engaged employees performing at 202% over companies without3 – the term “engagement” has significant ROI implications. While attributes like empowerment and inspiration are key factors of employee engagement, so too is communication. Meaningful communication that imparts the vision of the company (inspiration) and provides a sense of team and ambassadorship, keeps things relevant for the employees.

Similarly, in healthcare, engagement is being looked to as a strategic ROI driver. Engaged patients have better health (recovery) outcomes, engaged individuals have better success at managing chronic disease and preventing complications at a huge cost savings.4 But in the case of healthcare – the debate is heavy on the definition of “patient engagement”. Just having a patient portal or remote monitoring technologies in place is not enough. With adoption and usage rates lower than 10%, Electronic Medical Record systems and patient portals alone do not equal patient engagement. We need people to actively use them.5

The upcoming election has spawned an uptick in political engagement. The absurd number of Republican candidates alone has breathed new life into the party as issues and debates, jabs and sound bites rock the news across both parties. With a record setting 6 billion dollar projected political ad expenditure for 2016, the LA times reported that “The nominating process has taken on a higher profile with a more crowded and contentious field of presidential candidates and no White House incumbent running for reelection. Televised debates have drawn higher TV ratings.” but “the primary reason for the increase, observers say, is that campaigns and political fundraisers have figured out how to more fully exploit super PACs to raise huge sums of money to help their favorite candidates.” 6 That is to say – they’ve made it very relevant.

Why blog about this? Because we can be relevant in all these areas and more. In today’s digital, mobile environment, companies, organizations and causes can target very specific communications across very specific demographic and geographic markets to make sure the communications are reaching the people they’re meant for, the people for whom it is most relevant. The people with whom they are looking to engage. Wasteful mass market TV spends will be the dinosaurs of this era, like the opioid induced constipation ads from pharmaceutical companies Daiichi-Sankyo and AstraZeneca running in Sunday’s Super Bowl – irrelevant for most viewers, but posed as public service announcements co-sponsored by various pain management foundations.

This particular ad simply wasn’t relevant to the majority of viewers of the medium it was delivered through. Who stands to benefit? The manufacturers of the expensive drugs, adding to the cost of the medications by an expensive ad buy, in order to reach the 8 million or so potential users in a viewership of nearly 115 million. Baffling more than 100 million viewers with its obscurity. How to better deliver? Through pain management or constipation related resources, Doctors offices – awareness campaigns more targeted to the suffering individuals. The individuals and insurance providers who no doubt will be paying, in the cost of the medication, for the estimated 5-10 million-per-minute spots7.

Follow me here at Enradius in this 5-part blog series as we dig deeper into the concept of relevant engagement through the digital market.

Cindy Carson, cindy@enradius.com ; @cbcarson

 photo credit nenetus FreeDigitalPhotos.net

1 http://about.americanexpress.com/news/pr/2014/valentines-day-2014-more-spend-for-love.aspx

2 http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/C/curated_commerce.html

3 http://www.dalecarnegie.com/employee-engagement/engaged-employees-infographic/

4 http://www.healthitoutcomes.com/doc/the-shocking-truth-about-patient-engagement-0001

5 http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/what-does-patient-engagement-really-mean

6  http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-political-ad-spending-6-billion-dollars-in-2016-20151117-story.html

7 http://commonhealth.wbur.org/2016/02/super-bowl-opioid-constipation-ad

Selling Health

Promoting Good Health

We all know “Hump DAAAAY!”.

It’s a cultural icon, a rapidly recognized meme, and part of our vernacular around the office and throughout our social conversations. Why? Because a very clever group of copywriters and producers came up with it and the brand it was created for, Geico, broadcast the commercial repeatedly over time. It stuck.

Imagine if “What’s in your wallet?” was a campaign for um, ahem, safe sex? Or “Because I’m worth it” was a reminder for your yearly physical? If the country is serious about improving the health of the population – we need to think like a marketer.

Yes – I am suggesting that the groups most impacted by the cost of healthcare – apply a “population health” approach to achieving their objectives through marketing. Whether it’s targeted marketing to a specific demographic, or broader, mass marketing to the greater population, it’s time to get the right messages out.

In a country where:

  • nearly a third of the population has diabetes1
  • more than two thirds are considered to be overweight or obese2
  • about 610,000 Americans die from heart disease each year3—that’s 1 in every 4 deaths, and
  • 18.7 million adults and 8.9 million children have asthma4

and where we are spending upwards of 2.9 trillion in total national health expenditures5, it’s time to take a new approach! One that we KNOW works.

If advertising and marketing work so well that we need to regulate it, – just ask the likes of the Marlboro Man and the Joe Camel – both removed from mainstream media after controversial backlash around their advertising campaigns. If we need to control what messages are reaching our children, when and where adult beverages can be aired, and restricting cigarette ads, now one of the most highly regulated forms of marketing, (Some or all forms of tobacco advertising are banned in many countries).6 – let’s flip it! Make marketing work for health.

“Can you hear me now?”   I mean – can you really hear me? Do you get the concept? We need to be SELLING health! We’ve caught glimpses of it with product campaigns for milk (it does a body good), eggs (the incredible edible egg); and the Nike anchored motto of the exercise mindset “Just do it.” But these are product pushes where brands or associations promote a healthy concept they are aligning with the product, not a comprehensive push for health, wellness and prevention at a strategic level.

What if the product was health?

Imagine a country where the majority of citizens know the 6 warning signs of a heart attack? We know “two all-beef patties, lettuce, tomato, pickles, onion, special sauce all on a sesame seed bun,” so we know that it is possible and it works. We roll catch phrases into our daily conversations. They become a part of our culture, our lexicons. If we apply the same mass market principals to population health could we achieve the same results? I think so.

A “No Sweet” (play off of no sweat) campaign with headbands and sweatshirts, promoting unsweetened beverages and healthy alternatives to sugary foods like cereals and other breakfast foods that fall victim to large amounts of added sugar, could work. Or a catchy jingle for heart attack awareness cleverly packaged in an entertaining format and played repeatedly until 90% of all consumers not only recognize the message but can sing the whole thing are just hints at what’s possible.

I recently enjoyed a performance by a 7-year-old boy who recited the entire dialog for “The most interesting man in the world” commercial down to the “I don’t always drink beer. But when I do, I prefer Dos Equis.”  to the great delight and pride of his father, and entertainment of all those around.

Marketing works.

Imagine a time when “eat your greens” or “get your flu shot” can be packaged up and go viral, the icons for the message being slapped on T-shirts sold at the mall or bumper stickers for the college set. A time where “health” becomes cool.

Why not? It works for just about everything else. Let’s apply the same resources and creative to impacting one of the biggest challenges facing this nation. It’s rising cost of health. Diabetes, Obesity, Heart Failure, Cancer – come on people – let’s do this! What do we have to lose? Only 2.9 trillion in health care expenditures, 17.4% of our GDP7 , with lost productivity because of missed work due to health problems costing the US 84 billion each year according to a 2013 Gallup-Healthways report.

Did you know that 90% of all cancers are environmentally caused8? That means they are not genetic. In other words, they are PREVENTABLE. When you look at the health stats in this country it’s enough to make you crazy. Oh, and we haven’t even talked about the mental health market. With 14.8 million adults suffering from depression9.

How much can we influence it? A whole lot. Awareness, education, information and motivation are the messages and tools of our health campaigns.

So, what’s in your wallet? I hope it’s taken on a whole new meaning for you.

The possibilities are endless. Let’s continue the discussion – reach me at cindy@enradius.com or @cbcarson on Twitter.

6 Warning Signs of A Heart Attack:  (American Heart Association)

  • Chest Discomfortin the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body – Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath (with or without chest discomfort)
  • Cold Sweat
  • Nausea
  • Lightheadedness

 

1 http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/statsreport14/national-diabetes-report-web.pdf

http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Pages/overweight-obesity-statistics.aspx#b

3 http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_heart_disease.htm

4 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/asthma.htm

5 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/health-expenditures.htm

6  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Health_Cigarette_Smoking_Act

7 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/health-expenditures.htm

8 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2015/12/17/study-up-to-90-of-cancers-not-bad-luck-but-due-to-lifestyle-choices-environment/

9 http://www.adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Déjà vu All Over Again: Retargeting

Untitled

Retargeting is a concept that can be confusing and one topic that we get more questions about than almost any other. Here is a clear explanation and examples of the benefits of both a targeting and retargeting campaign as described by Blair Jeffris of the blog Retargeter:

Your audience data is as good as gold (probably better) when it comes to the returns you can earn from it. We call it Return On Audience Data (ROAD). You’re probably familiar with Return On Ad Spend (ROAS), a key performance metric in advertising. ROAS and ROAD are related, so let’s start by clarifying the relationship between Ad Spend and Audience Data.

ROAS = Revenue ÷ Ad Spend (there are variations, but we’ll use this one)

How do you calculate Ad Spend?

A partially true statement:  Ad Spend = Cost of Media

A truer statement:  Ad Spend = Cost of Media + Audience Data

In fact, 2nd and 3rd party audience data is often more expensive than the cost of media for digital display advertising, sometimes much more expensive.

1st party audience data is the data you already own. It wasn’t necessarily free to acquire it, but now you own it. Your audience data includes the visitors to your website that you cookie, your email lists and CRM data, your app users, and more. When you use your own audience data for digital display advertising, we call it retargeting or remarketing. With retargeting you eliminate a major expense in your advertising, data, and you amplify your revenue. Retargeting is one example of how we build Return On Audience Data (ROAD).

MEASURING ROAS AND ROAD

To better understand the importance of ROAD and how it can drive ROAS, let’s look at examples of Audience Targeting and Retargeting campaigns and compare results.

Audience Targeting. Let’s say we run an ad campaign to reach a new audience using 3rd party audience data. We are buying data from other (3rd party) sources to reach this audience. It’s an audience we want to reach, but it’s not yet our audience data. We call this Audience Targeting:

Audience Targeting campaign assumptions:

Media CPM = $3.00 (inventory cost per 1,000 impressions served)

Data CPM = $3.00 (data cost per 1,000 impressions served; when you buy audience data to target a specific audience, you pay the data provider each time you serve an ad to this audience)

Impressions served = 1,000,000

Click-thru rate = .1%

Conversion rate = 1.5%

Average order value = $200

Using the assumptions above, we calculate ROAS:

Ad spend = ($3 + $3) * 1,000,000 ÷ 1,000 = $6,000

Revenue = .1% * 1,000,000 * 1.5% * $200 = $3,000

Audience Targeting ROAS = $3,000 ÷ $6000 = $.50

The upshot? For every dollar invested, we generated $.50 in revenue on this campaign. We actually have negative ROAS on this Audience Targeting campaign, but that’s okay with us because we acquired 15 new customers and each customer has a lifetime value (LTV) of $1,200, so we’ll generate a return on this campaign over the customer lifetime, especially when we combine this campaign with our Retargeting campaign.

Retargeting. Now let’s make some assumptions about a campaign we run using our 1st party audience data. This is our retargeting campaign. There are different types of retargeting including Site Retargeting, Facebook Retargeting (FBX,) CRM Retargeting and more. We’ve adjusted some of the assumptions, because this is an audience we’ve already engaged and they behave differently than an audience we’ve not engaged. Note that this audience includes users we acquired through our Audience Targeting campaign:

Retargeting campaign assumptions:

Media CPM = $3.00

Data CPM = $0

Impressions served = 1,000,000

Click-thru rate = .13%

Conversion rate = 3%

Average order value = $300

Using the assumptions above, we calculate ROAS:

Ad spend = ($3 + $0) * 1,000,000 ÷ 1,000 = $3,000

Revenue = .13% * 1,000,000 * 3% * $300 = $11,700

Retargeting ROAS = $11,700 ÷ $3000 = $3.90

The upshot? For every dollar invested, we generated nearly $4.00 in revenue on this campaign! By using our 1st party data, we didn’t incur a data cost and our ad spend was cut in half, which by itself effectively doubles our ROAS! Furthermore, the audience we reach using our 1st party data converts at a higher rate and spends more than the audience we reach using 3rd party data. Using our 1st party audience data v. 3rd party audience data, we generated an incremental return of nearly $3.50 for each dollar spent! That’s an example of how we build Return On Audience Data (ROAD).

 

About Jim Dolan: Jim is EVP Revenue Strategies for Enradius, a Baltimore based digital agency specializing in geo-targeting/geo-fencing and cross device matching. Jim can be reached at jim@enradius.com

 

The Video Star is Alive and Thriving

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Video is the hot item right now in the digital ad world and it doesn’t appear that it will be cooling off any time soon. Big companies like Comcast, Verizon, Yahoo and Google are snatching up video content producers and video ad technology like Black Friday at Walmart.

The metrics seem to support the hype. In a just released report from ComScore and Opera Mediaworks, participants seeing native mobile video advertising delivered significantly higher metrics both at the top of the sales funnel and at the bottom of the sales funnel: indicators such as purchase intent, recall and likelihood to recommend.

Here are some statistics from Adelie Studios that show why video marketing is one of the best marketing opportunities in 2015 and the coming years:

  • 70% of marketing professionals report that video converts better than any other medium.
  •  The average internet user spends 88% more time on a website with video than without.
  • 64% of consumers are more likely to buy a product after watching a video about it.
  • Using videos on landing pages can increase conversions by 80%.
  • 59% of viewers will watch a video to completion that is less than 1 minute.
  • Despite all of this, only 24% of brands are using online video to market to consumers.

Clearly there is a huge opportunity to get in and stake out real estate in the world of digital video advertising channels. And if you have existing content, research shows that your repurposed content can deliver superior brand recall.

What about available video inventory?? It is a hot topic when it comes to video. Many in the business write off the shortage of inventory tales as a lot of hokum; supply side PR that only serves to drive up pricing; and that, aside from chokepoints that appear in swing or rural battleground states during election cycles, there is actually plenty of video inventory to go around. In some instances you should be to accept some skippable video inventory along with your non-skippable.   The pricing on average is around $16-$20 CPM, although more typical pricing is now based on a Cost Per View (CPV) model.

Says Kenny Day of BrightRoll: “Once you get beyond sites like YouTube or Hulu, inventory is widely available. In fact, it could be considered the prime real estate.”

“Sixty percent of the population never sees a YouTube video,” he says. “Smaller publishers with loyal followings — that’s where the action is.”

So, who are the top advertisers from Q2 ‘15 currently using video?:

  1. Apple Inc.
  2. VEVO LLC
  3. Geico
  4. Procter & Gamble
  5. T-Mobile
  6. State Farm
  7. Google
  8. Hotwire, Inc.
  9. Hulu
  10. Microsoft

Top Categories are:

  1. Food & Drink
  2. Financial Services
  3. Arts & Entertainment
  4. Auto
  5. Computers & Consumer Electronics

Here are the main takeaways about video advertising:

  • The power of video to brand and persuade is undisputed. Video can increase conversions on landing pages by 80%
  • Video pricing will only come down as video inventory increases….and there is plenty out there currently. Best practice is to plan as far ahead as is practicable to ensure availability and pricing.
  • Repurposed video contributes to elevated recall, so don’t be afraid to use an existing TV spot.
  • The field is wide open…only 24% of advertisers are using video.

 

About Jim Dolan: Jim is EVP Revenue Strategies for Enradius, a Baltimore based digital agency specializing in geo-targeting/geo-fencing and cross device matching. Jim can be reached at jim@enradius.com