4 Tips for High Engagement on Digital Campaigns

posted by Kelly Jarvis
Vice President Digital Strategy – DC

We all want our advertising to be highly successful and send droves of people walking through the door, but we all know that doesn’t always happen. Millions of dollars are spent each year on advertisements that don’t work. Don’t be that guy. Use sound traditional marketing practices with solid knowledge of the digital world and create campaigns that work.

 

In a country where over 6 billion texts are sent each day, 68% of adult Americans are on Facebook, and there are 1.1 billion tablet users worldwide, it’s easy to argue that the place to find people these days is on their devices. You don’t need numbers to realize that. Just look around you in the grocery store line, the subway, or your own home.

 

Here are 4 tips for making your digital campaign worthwhile.

 

1. Know your goal.
What exactly are you trying to accomplish? What defines success? Is it getting viewers to click to the website? Walk through the door with a coupon? Make a direct purchase? Download an app? You have to work toward a specific goal in order to create an effective campaign.
If you’re playing in the digital world, make sure your goals are digital in nature. And make sure you have digital follow up. For example, the next action should be just as easy as the first click. Have a good website. Make a short and easy form. Don’t lose the conversion after you got them to click.

 

2. Create good ads.
This seems obvious, but there are a lot of bad ones out there. Remember: You have two seconds to catch their attention. The old adage ‘a picture speaks a thousand words’ is true! Find pictures that tell your story. Always use a call to action.
To do that well, use the old who, what, when, where, and why. Keep all of these things in mind when choosing profile targeting, creative messaging, and tactics.
WHO are you talking to?
WHAT do you want them to do?
WHEN are they going to see this?
WHERE are they going to see this?
WHY should they care?
If you didn’t consider all of this when creating your ad, then you might just be yelling, ‘ME, ME, ME’ at them instead of asking what THEY want to see/hear from you.

 

3.  Use all available ad sizes.
It’s a bidding war out there on the internet and you’re fighting for every piece of available inventory within the specific group you’re trying to reach. If a user is on a specific website that only uses the 300 x 600 size and you just didn’t include that in your creative, that’s a missed opportunity.  Mobile typically has higher engagement than desktop so that 320 x 50 size better be in the mix. 300 x 250 is very standard and while it doesn’t have as high engagement as some other sizes, you’ll still miss out on some key inventory if you simply don’t provide it. Make all the sizes your digital team recommends…and if they’re not recommending them, find another digital team.
With that said, if high engagement is your goal (see #1) and you have a very large geography and profile, then maybe go all mobile.

 

4. Rotate your creative from the get-go…and regularly throughout.
This is a good plan overall, but especially true if you’re targeting a very specific group. For example, a retail location targeting parents within a 10 mile radius should know that their intended target may see their ad a few times. As you’d imagine, each time they see it, the likelihood of engaging with it goes down. Either they’ve seen it enough and they’re annoyed or they’ve already clicked on it. Make sure you show them something different. Choose a few messages you want to get across and let them tell the story. Maybe you have a generic branding message, one special event, and one special offer that, together, make up the story you want to tell.

 

In a 3 month campaign, make sure you’re switching out (or at least adding in) new creative each month.  And please, make the creative timely. Don’t be talking about snow blowers in May!

 

Lastly, pick a good digital team that can guide you through all of this, bring great experience to the table, and will optimize your campaign over time to make sure you’re getting what you want out of it.

 

kelly head shot in front of church (2) About Kelly:
Kelly’s focus is to use her knowledge of traditional marketing and passion for digital to help businesses learn how to navigate the digital world. She built her career in the DC area in promotions and sales at major broadcast groups, including ABC Radio, CBS Radio, and Clear Channel, then served over 2,000 radio stations across the country to help them evolve to HD Radio Technology. She most recently served as Director of Digital for a Baltimore radio station helping to diversify their digital offerings and was an Enradius client before she joined the team. Kelly’s philosophy is to approach every task with genuine passion and excitement and she thrives on the creativity of finding the perfect audience and perfect message to craft a killer digital campaign.
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Conference Marketing – on premise and off – 5 Winning Strategies That Drive Leads

Conference marketing – on premise and off – 5 winning strategies that drive leads

We know you invest a lot in your conference participation. From booth development and construction, collateral and giveaways, to the staff sent to man it, a conference is no light commitment. Yet so many times up and down the aisles of conferences big and small, there are the winners –  with people lined up to see what it’s all about, and the ones that miss the mark – booth managers sitting dejected behind a dish chock full of give-away pencils.

It’s not always about the product or service at hand. You wouldn’t be at the conference if the topic missed the mark, and people generally don’t go to conferences unless they have an interest in or work in the industry or subject being presented. Therefor we will factor that there is an inherent relevance. Attendees have some level of interest in your offering and you have some level of interest in speaking with them.

So why does it go downhill from there? There are 5 key, easy to identify challenges which many managers find hard to overcome. We’ve provided the strategies that will help you make your conference participation worth the effort.

  • Lack of planning and pre-marketing – Everyone is running a mile a minute leading up to the conference, how can you possibly do any “pre-event” marketing?

How to fix it: Get the list of attendees ahead of time, send a personal note (postcard, email or letter); PIXEL (cookie) the email or landing page of the promoted website where people will go to get more information, and add those individuals to a remarketing campaign counting down the weeks/days to the event. Reaching folks digitally is a great way to stay in front of them with your brand in a fun, consistent way so when they get to the conference, they have instant recognition of who you are and what you do, because of course, you will have read item #2 to reinforce this.

Include a special offer so if they stop by your booth and have the secret code – they get something unique or useful. One of my favorite uses of this tactic was a group who sent out actual invitations prior to the conference, including a branded coffee mug. In the letter, they asked prospects to come by their booth and meet with them to pick up the coffee to go with it (a $10 Starbucks card). Bribery? Maybe – but it worked, and people responded. Remember the theory of inherent relevance. Plus, you control who gets these special offers, tailor them to the industry, have fun with them or make it practical.

Is there a conference app? Most conferences are implementing conference apps like SummitSync to help conference goers network and communicate before the conference, during the conference and to stay connected after. Use it! SummitSync is a social app for conference goers.  You can quickly identify who you want to connect with, make appointments to meet and broaden your network, maximizing your time in attendance.

Use Lists. Have a check off list for everything you need to take, pull everything together a week prior and make sure you know the shipping dates and policies for the event;

Have a calendar – set dates to complete you pre-marketing efforts; your pre-booked appointments, travel times and post event follow up activities. Treat it all as if it was a very important meeting, and you can’t miss any of them.

  • Misalignment of message – whether you’re using up old collateral, brought the wrong banner (see #1) or have untrained people manning the booth – by not having a clearly identified Value Prop, visible everywhere and repeated often – you’re missing out on one of the key reasons for being there – branding and awareness of who you are and what you do.

How to fix it: ALWAYS put your best foot forward. Anything less and people will judge you for it. Invest in the best booth you can, make sure your collateral is up to date or don’t use it – offer an online version instead, organize what you need days ahead – do a mock set up to see how it all looks, and train your people! Give them talking points, arm them with samples, role play and ask challenging questions. Make sure your message and brand are familiar to attendees by following the tactics in #1 and repeat that message throughout the conference.

Reinforce that message by geotargeting the conference center and all the hotels within a logical 1-10 mile radius, and follow up your branding message with digital marketing to targets in the comfort of their hotel room or over dinner in a nearby restaurant.  Put out a NEW special offer to get them to stop by – maybe a conference survival pack with chocolate, water, extra coffee, and some cozy socks for weary feet at the end of a long day. Put your spin on it but make it meaningful. Have people register online for the goody pack and come by the booth to pick it up – that way you have prospect information being collected even while you are hitting the gym off hours.

  • Lack of engagement mechanism – why should people talk to you? Forget the stickers and bingo dots – unless you’re giving away an iPad or a Hover Board what’s going to get people to come talk to you?

How to Fix it: If you’ve done your homework from items #1 & 2 and planted a few seeds, even set up some pre-determined meetings, you’ll have people lining up to see what all the fuss is about. Promote designated times for demonstrations; don’t fall for gimmicks – I once had my photo taken with Cinderella at a health conference – I had absolutely no interaction with the booth who sponsored her – just stood there taking up their booth space saying “Cheese” – Gimmicks might get people to your booth – but not the right people. Instead offer live demos, compelling video on a big screen of people using your product or service and making their lives better because of it, or a Q&A session with the founder or inventor, developer, family, CEO or best client. Better yet – brand yourself ahead of time with special invites to have a personal demonstration or meeting.

  • No follow up plan – If I had a dollar for every business card I’ve seen collected in a fishbowl….

How to Fix it: For every business card collected have a next step identified – is it a call to discuss? – set a day and time as you collect the card, or is it a referral to someone in your organization – send an email intro in the moment. Identify the specific follow up activity for each lead or prospect and assign a deadline. Prioritize. Follow up with the most pressing and most relevant leads first. Delegate. If you have the support, delegate unqualified leads to someone else. In addition, do broad follow up to the list of attendees, reach back out digitally and retarget prospects who ended up opening an email or going to your website, use the conference app to check back in with connections and make the most of your time and budget by not missing a moment to do business with the people you deemed worthy to spend your time with.

  • Tracking for ROI  That’s immediate ROI as in closed deals, potential ROI as in feeding your pipeline, and lifetime ROI as in the long-term value of a newly acquired client or the nurturing and development of a current one. Many organizations fall-down here. It’s all lumped together with every other business development effort.

How to fix it: There’s no reason for this. Today’s technology allows for easier tracking than ever.  Most CRMs provide features to identify leads with source codes. Digital campaigns can be tracked and funneled into your pipeline with campaign codes and even if you are working with simple excel spreadsheets – add a column identifying your lead source. Follow the dollars. Use the data to justify your expense in both materials and time.

Simple improvements in each of these areas will help you shine at your next conference, have a deeper understanding of the impact you are having on your bottom line and make it easier and less stressful as you drive more qualified leads. For more information about geotargeting and retargeting, give us a call today. Enradius 800-838-1184.

*Photo Credit: Adler Display

Top 7 Geotargeted Marketing Strategies for B2B (Engage me part 3)

Geotarget

Geotargeting is a great way to get your brand or services in front of the decision makers you need to reach. From the C suite to HR, middle management to small business owners – find their digital footprint. Then position your business in front of them, seamlessly, as part of their everyday online experience.

In the previous post we covered curated ads. Ads directed to a targeted profile, receptive to the message based on demographics, behavioral and geographical markers. Here we will dive into how this applies to B2B.

Your brand’s online presence is a critical component of your overall brand perception.  As mobile has overtaken desktop, and more time is spent online, more conversions happen in this space. Businesses need to have a greater presence in this conversation.  Here are strategies to leverage to drive effective B2B results with geotargeting and retargeting

  1. Find their footprints: Two great ways to find your audiences are by using Audience Insights and Lookalike Audiences.
    1. Use Audience Insights to review demographics and purchase behavior, as well as details around interests and lifestyle. This information will help you understand how to reach who currently connects with your brand. Tailor your creative and target prospects with interests and demographics based on these insights to change how they perceive your brand.
    2. Use Lookalike Audiences to find more people who look like your best customers.
  2. Some ads are better than others – Create ads that build awareness and consideration. An ad is only as “good” or effective as the quality of its composition. From how it’s written, to the images used, to making sure the call to action is functioning (no broken links!), in the digital space you have good creative options:
    1. Video – video is where it’s at. People are responding and appreciating video communications and it’s the best way to convey your “story.” Here’s our videographer’s reel samples – http://www.outerloopmedia.com/#!motion-reel/cee5 He does a great job at “capturing the essence” These are an example of long version videos which would live on the landing page, and a short 15-30 sec “clip” with a call to action would be the “ad” to entice a click through, a registration, a phone call or a memorable intention.
    2. Carousel – Leverage multiple images within a single ad experience.
    3. Link ads – A compelling image and a strong headline, a bit of descriptive info and a call to action make up a good link ad. Make sure your telling your prospects where they are linking to and what to expect when they get there. (learn more here: http://www.enradius.com/services/zip-code-targeted-advertising-products/ )
  3. Geofence actual addresses – trying to reach nurse executives? Geotarget a radius around medical campuses and around hospital systems with demographic overlays for nurses; managers. Want to engage corporate travelers? Geotarget Airports with demographic overlays for business traveler or specific industry profiles.
  4. Geofence by city or zip code – Need to reach broad regions? Added behavioral data can help you saturate a region to reach the right targets.
  5. Retarget – pixel your website and retarget visitors with ongoing marketing; Retargeting is a process in which a pixel is placed onto your website or into an outgoing email. Once a visitor comes to your site or opens your email, a cookie is placed on their computer.  This allows us to ‘re-serve’ your message to them as a way to re-engage and bring them back. A Pixel is code that instructs a website to take action.  There are actually (2) types of Pixels.  A retargeting pixel and a conversion pixel.  Ways to Retarget:
    1. Pixel Your Website
    2. Pixel placed in an out-going email
    3. Pixel placed in a video at ¼ , ½, ¾, or completion
    4. On Facebook by matching up email addresses in your database
  6. Conquest your conference – to add some zing to your typical conference exhibit – geotarget the location of your conference. Nothing like reinforcing the message of your day behind the booth with some powerful online exposure as conference goers catch up on their favorite news or entertainment back in the comfort of their hotel. And again, a week after, when they’re back at home (Yes! We can do that!)
  7. A/B test your messages; targets; and networks – validate what works. Use data to drive smart marketing decisions.

Don’t have time or the interest to do all this? Don’t panic, give us a call. We can help.

Enradius digital geotargeting and retargeting puts you in front of the business decision makers you are trying to reach. We have the expertise in developing digital strategy customized to your organizations’ goals and needs. And we practice real time monitoring of campaigns to make adjustments in order to maximize your impact. You don’t get  that from an automated platform. Try  the B2B geotargeting recommendations out for yourself or let us help you manage your digital campaigns. We’re good at it.

Curate My A _ _! That’s ADS, people. (Part two – Engage Me)

Continuing the discussion on keeping it relevant in marketing in order to engage with your target audience, and the demand in the marketplace for everything curated.

When we look across the digital market we see something for everyone – an entire universe of information, products and services. We can search for anything. A-ny-thing.

Digital has also given marketers the ability to layer data to reach individuals who most closely match ideal customers. Add to that today’s mobile environment, and we have the ability to geographically target in real time.  This is pretty exciting stuff.

What does that mean to a consumer? Ads that are meaningful to one’s interests and needs that enhance the online experience. What does that mean to a marketer? It means effective CPMs with a higher level of engagement. It’s all based on relevancy to the receiver.

In a market where everything from razors to music, news feeds, entertainment, groceries, and fashion accessories can be served up in a curated fashion, subscribed to for convenience and novelty (such as Nature Box and Amazon Pantry,) we need to think of marketing messages in the same way. No longer are marketers beholden to the red car approach to marketing. (The approach that you keep putting your ad out there in the hopes that when a person is ready to buy a new red car, that your ad then become relevant, and registers with that consumer. The same thing applies to homes, mattresses, sofas, legal services, etc.)

We’re not talking about branding, that’s a whole different conversation. We’re talking about calls to action with intent to purchase, or sign up, or engage. Products or services that meet a specific need. Some, like razors and groceries, are consumable, some like mattresses and cars, are big ticket items, and some like Netflix and Pandora are services.

Really, any product or service can benefit from a curated approach to advertising. Put your message in front of the people with whom it will most soundly resonate. This requires knowing your audience.

In the decades before digital, marketers relied on print, radio and TV which could segment audiences based on program, broad viewership or subscription base, and readership/viewership, survey-based demographics.

What’s changed is the ability to identify a viewer’s preferences across multiple categories and narrower geo-locations. So ads for a restaurant more than 30 miles away don’t muddy the online experience of an individual without a car. Or ads for a vision center don’t get lost on a person who doesn’t wear glasses.

Essentially, what we are talking about is digital ad curation. Ads that reach you based on your wants or needs, even the ones you didn’t realize you had, because of your digital profile. This is where profiling is a good thing! Ads that have meaning for the viewer, and a higher rate of engagement for the advertiser. Is it a hit all the time? Of course not, but the odds have definitely improved.

In magazines, the good ones anyway, the advertisements have long been regarded to add to the overall experience of the reader. This has been documented by many reader surveys, and part of what drives ads into this medium. We read a fashion magazine, and we pour over the ads by Calvin Klein, DKNY, and Prada. We appreciate the aesthetic and trend indicators they represent. Or the ads that offer up details about new products in skin care. For the most part the ads add to and improve the readers’ experience. This is in direct proportion to their relevancy to the readers’ interests.

Why is this? The content is specific to a topic, it’s a fashion magazine. The same principle applies to a travel magazine with ads for an exotic vacation or ads for an airline, luggage, travel guides, and resort wear. A business or news magazine will offer up corporate real estate, legal advice and banking. This is a simplified view but the advertisers who support topic specific magazines know that they are in good company within the pages to serve up information to readers who meet a defined demographic. And the readers place a value on the ads as enhancing their experience.

The more specific the topic, like bicycling or gardening, the more companies that service these interests can expect to engage with the readers. This gets more difficult to determine the broader the topics, like the news, or the weather. And it’s limiting to big brands at a national level or to some local zoned ads in the back of the book. Or complicated national ad buys across local networked (or not) publications. The same can be said pretty much for radio and TV, which generally have broader market demographics.

But in digital, and this is where it gets interesting, we not only have the very specific “readership” and “viewership” topics like fashion or sports, we have many data layers at our disposal for those who choose to play the game. We can target specific demographics of consumers as they take in the news and check the weather online as well as in topic specific websites.

It’s like being able to identify the garden magazine reader while they are reading or watching the morning news. We can take all of that topic specific targeting and apply it across the broader information sources. And through the digital ad networks, we can follow that person throughout their online experiences.

Our personal online profiles allow relevant ads to come to us in a seamless flow. Like if we are male or female. So yes fellas – this means no more feminine hygiene ads of any sort disturbing your viewership. And apartment dwellers? No lawn and garden ads required. Deliver these messages to the people who fit the user profile.

Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, has made a big show over higher priced devices that “protect” user’s data profiles. But why is that a good thing? Anonymous tracking and data that enhances what I see and experience online is a welcome application in my book. The algorithms that allow for recommended items as I shop, or drive, are also “recommending” advertisements for things in which I have an interest. This ads to my digital experience.

Why marketers should pay attention to this: It’s a natural tendency to want to tell everyone about our business or product, but not everyone cares. Put your marketing budget toward reaching people where you can best engage them. Even with PSA’s (Public Service Announcements) – leverage your impact where it can do the most good!

The current smoking cessation campaigns by the American Legacy Foundation, branded “truth”, running on tv and cable are well done and compelling if even a bit controversial, but over-reached and wasteful. They are hitting households without smokers or youth (for prevention), in prime TV networks that aren’t cheap. Don’t waste foundation money on irrelevant markets. The “truth” campaign is targeting youth, and where do teens spend the most time? On their mobile devices. With teen smoking down to just 7%, as stated on the truth website, put your ego’s away and get smart about your ad spends. (the ad campaign won an Effie award in 2005)1

40 million adult smokers, many living in southern states that are tobacco friendly, are identifiable by geography, and demographics. The CDC’s marketing approach is more effective. Geographically based and across multiple media outlets, including digital. The CDC campaign targets individuals within population sectors that are most likely to smoke, including military and individuals with behavioral health issues that make them prone to the habit. 2

For B2B companies – digital gets even better. Stay tuned as we venture into the B2B sector in the next post of this 5 part series on engagement.

As always – the basic principles of good design, strong creative, and thoughtful execution apply. An ad is only as effective as the set up. A targeted message in a poorly executed package is still a bad ad. Check the phone numbers, make sure your links work, and track it.

Let me know your thoughts on curated ads – and the movement towards digital targeted marketing. It’s a fast changing mobile market and we’re just getting started.

1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth_Initiative

2 http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-01-

Engage Me

February 9, 2016

  ID-100342259 (1)

The key to engagement is keeping it relevant

“Engagement” is the buzz word at the top of the list this month. More than 10% of American Couples get engaged (6 million Americans plan to ask or accept a proposal) on Valentine’s Day, making it the number one day of the year for the momentous event. And for the 50 billion dollar a year wedding industry – that’s big business. But even higher on the buzz worthy list is “engagement” of a different sort. Fan engagement, employee engagement, patient engagement, political engagement – these are ever present topics across national conversations, in the news, and problem solving within the markets themselves. Engagement is what everyone is striving for.

In today’s heightened “information now” mentality, the population expects to be engaged across all sectors of the marketplace. Entertainment is on-demand, curated, and recommended; employee retention and productivity requires employees to be actively “engaged” with their work and their employers; in healthcare – patient empowerment, shared decision making, and informed consent through patient engagement are key metrics of success; the 2016 election requires party members’ support, activated grass roots efforts and debate turnouts. Across the board we’re talking about an increasing level of “engagement” from stakeholders.

So – how do we accomplish this? The key lies in making touch points relevant. Communications (ads, notifications, information) must speak directly to the issue, be interesting and visually appealing, and capture the attention of the intended target within 3 seconds or be deemed unengaging and therefore – irrelevant.

We are seeing more and more use of the term “curated” – from curated content to curated commerce2. What it boils down to is making things immediate, and relevant, for the consumer. From subscription commerce (think Dollar Shave Club and Birch Box) to Amazon’s “Recommendations for You” based on your shopping and viewing patterns, the Netflix and Xfinity on-demand entertainment models, to targeted digital ads that seem to stalk you throughout the internet reminding you of the pair of boots you abandoned in the Zappo’s shopping cart or the coffee table you lusted after on Wayfair – we are living in a customized consumer market.

Employers are encouraged to monitor the engagement of their employees in order to maximize productivity. With 71% of all employees not fully engaged, and the companies with engaged employees performing at 202% over companies without3 – the term “engagement” has significant ROI implications. While attributes like empowerment and inspiration are key factors of employee engagement, so too is communication. Meaningful communication that imparts the vision of the company (inspiration) and provides a sense of team and ambassadorship, keeps things relevant for the employees.

Similarly, in healthcare, engagement is being looked to as a strategic ROI driver. Engaged patients have better health (recovery) outcomes, engaged individuals have better success at managing chronic disease and preventing complications at a huge cost savings.4 But in the case of healthcare – the debate is heavy on the definition of “patient engagement”. Just having a patient portal or remote monitoring technologies in place is not enough. With adoption and usage rates lower than 10%, Electronic Medical Record systems and patient portals alone do not equal patient engagement. We need people to actively use them.5

The upcoming election has spawned an uptick in political engagement. The absurd number of Republican candidates alone has breathed new life into the party as issues and debates, jabs and sound bites rock the news across both parties. With a record setting 6 billion dollar projected political ad expenditure for 2016, the LA times reported that “The nominating process has taken on a higher profile with a more crowded and contentious field of presidential candidates and no White House incumbent running for reelection. Televised debates have drawn higher TV ratings.” but “the primary reason for the increase, observers say, is that campaigns and political fundraisers have figured out how to more fully exploit super PACs to raise huge sums of money to help their favorite candidates.” 6 That is to say – they’ve made it very relevant.

Why blog about this? Because we can be relevant in all these areas and more. In today’s digital, mobile environment, companies, organizations and causes can target very specific communications across very specific demographic and geographic markets to make sure the communications are reaching the people they’re meant for, the people for whom it is most relevant. The people with whom they are looking to engage. Wasteful mass market TV spends will be the dinosaurs of this era, like the opioid induced constipation ads from pharmaceutical companies Daiichi-Sankyo and AstraZeneca running in Sunday’s Super Bowl – irrelevant for most viewers, but posed as public service announcements co-sponsored by various pain management foundations.

This particular ad simply wasn’t relevant to the majority of viewers of the medium it was delivered through. Who stands to benefit? The manufacturers of the expensive drugs, adding to the cost of the medications by an expensive ad buy, in order to reach the 8 million or so potential users in a viewership of nearly 115 million. Baffling more than 100 million viewers with its obscurity. How to better deliver? Through pain management or constipation related resources, Doctors offices – awareness campaigns more targeted to the suffering individuals. The individuals and insurance providers who no doubt will be paying, in the cost of the medication, for the estimated 5-10 million-per-minute spots7.

Follow me here at Enradius in this 5-part blog series as we dig deeper into the concept of relevant engagement through the digital market.

Cindy Carson, cindy@enradius.com ; @cbcarson

 photo credit nenetus FreeDigitalPhotos.net

1 http://about.americanexpress.com/news/pr/2014/valentines-day-2014-more-spend-for-love.aspx

2 http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/C/curated_commerce.html

3 http://www.dalecarnegie.com/employee-engagement/engaged-employees-infographic/

4 http://www.healthitoutcomes.com/doc/the-shocking-truth-about-patient-engagement-0001

5 http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/what-does-patient-engagement-really-mean

6  http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-political-ad-spending-6-billion-dollars-in-2016-20151117-story.html

7 http://commonhealth.wbur.org/2016/02/super-bowl-opioid-constipation-ad

Selling Health

Promoting Good Health

We all know “Hump DAAAAY!”.

It’s a cultural icon, a rapidly recognized meme, and part of our vernacular around the office and throughout our social conversations. Why? Because a very clever group of copywriters and producers came up with it and the brand it was created for, Geico, broadcast the commercial repeatedly over time. It stuck.

Imagine if “What’s in your wallet?” was a campaign for um, ahem, safe sex? Or “Because I’m worth it” was a reminder for your yearly physical? If the country is serious about improving the health of the population – we need to think like a marketer.

Yes – I am suggesting that the groups most impacted by the cost of healthcare – apply a “population health” approach to achieving their objectives through marketing. Whether it’s targeted marketing to a specific demographic, or broader, mass marketing to the greater population, it’s time to get the right messages out.

In a country where:

  • nearly a third of the population has diabetes1
  • more than two thirds are considered to be overweight or obese2
  • about 610,000 Americans die from heart disease each year3—that’s 1 in every 4 deaths, and
  • 18.7 million adults and 8.9 million children have asthma4

and where we are spending upwards of 2.9 trillion in total national health expenditures5, it’s time to take a new approach! One that we KNOW works.

If advertising and marketing work so well that we need to regulate it, – just ask the likes of the Marlboro Man and the Joe Camel – both removed from mainstream media after controversial backlash around their advertising campaigns. If we need to control what messages are reaching our children, when and where adult beverages can be aired, and restricting cigarette ads, now one of the most highly regulated forms of marketing, (Some or all forms of tobacco advertising are banned in many countries).6 – let’s flip it! Make marketing work for health.

“Can you hear me now?”   I mean – can you really hear me? Do you get the concept? We need to be SELLING health! We’ve caught glimpses of it with product campaigns for milk (it does a body good), eggs (the incredible edible egg); and the Nike anchored motto of the exercise mindset “Just do it.” But these are product pushes where brands or associations promote a healthy concept they are aligning with the product, not a comprehensive push for health, wellness and prevention at a strategic level.

What if the product was health?

Imagine a country where the majority of citizens know the 6 warning signs of a heart attack? We know “two all-beef patties, lettuce, tomato, pickles, onion, special sauce all on a sesame seed bun,” so we know that it is possible and it works. We roll catch phrases into our daily conversations. They become a part of our culture, our lexicons. If we apply the same mass market principals to population health could we achieve the same results? I think so.

A “No Sweet” (play off of no sweat) campaign with headbands and sweatshirts, promoting unsweetened beverages and healthy alternatives to sugary foods like cereals and other breakfast foods that fall victim to large amounts of added sugar, could work. Or a catchy jingle for heart attack awareness cleverly packaged in an entertaining format and played repeatedly until 90% of all consumers not only recognize the message but can sing the whole thing are just hints at what’s possible.

I recently enjoyed a performance by a 7-year-old boy who recited the entire dialog for “The most interesting man in the world” commercial down to the “I don’t always drink beer. But when I do, I prefer Dos Equis.”  to the great delight and pride of his father, and entertainment of all those around.

Marketing works.

Imagine a time when “eat your greens” or “get your flu shot” can be packaged up and go viral, the icons for the message being slapped on T-shirts sold at the mall or bumper stickers for the college set. A time where “health” becomes cool.

Why not? It works for just about everything else. Let’s apply the same resources and creative to impacting one of the biggest challenges facing this nation. It’s rising cost of health. Diabetes, Obesity, Heart Failure, Cancer – come on people – let’s do this! What do we have to lose? Only 2.9 trillion in health care expenditures, 17.4% of our GDP7 , with lost productivity because of missed work due to health problems costing the US 84 billion each year according to a 2013 Gallup-Healthways report.

Did you know that 90% of all cancers are environmentally caused8? That means they are not genetic. In other words, they are PREVENTABLE. When you look at the health stats in this country it’s enough to make you crazy. Oh, and we haven’t even talked about the mental health market. With 14.8 million adults suffering from depression9.

How much can we influence it? A whole lot. Awareness, education, information and motivation are the messages and tools of our health campaigns.

So, what’s in your wallet? I hope it’s taken on a whole new meaning for you.

The possibilities are endless. Let’s continue the discussion – reach me at cindy@enradius.com or @cbcarson on Twitter.

6 Warning Signs of A Heart Attack:  (American Heart Association)

  • Chest Discomfortin the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body – Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath (with or without chest discomfort)
  • Cold Sweat
  • Nausea
  • Lightheadedness

 

1 http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/statsreport14/national-diabetes-report-web.pdf

http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Pages/overweight-obesity-statistics.aspx#b

3 http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_heart_disease.htm

4 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/asthma.htm

5 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/health-expenditures.htm

6  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Health_Cigarette_Smoking_Act

7 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/health-expenditures.htm

8 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2015/12/17/study-up-to-90-of-cancers-not-bad-luck-but-due-to-lifestyle-choices-environment/

9 http://www.adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Duct Tape and Paper Clips

I’m no MacGyver. Trying to get the job done when the right tool is not at hand is not my specialty.
Honestly, I don’t MacGyverthink that it is many people’s specialty. Working withduct tape and a paper clip can take a lot of time and it can certainly make for a lot of detours; and by then…well, the house might have already blown up!

The right tool for the right job… It eliminates all that wasted time and energy; and It just makes you FEEL better, knowing that the tool that you are using is the tool that was designed to get the job done efficiently and right the FIRST time.

It occurred to me that geo targeting and its little sister geo fencing are tools that are just right for quite a few things. So as a thought starter for advancing your business, here are some of the jobs that they are ideally suited to attack:

  • Retail: Attracting traffic that is in your area to your location at the point closest to the sale.  Right place and right time!
  • Conquest: Hitting auto buyers as they are sitting outside of your competitor’s showroom. Stealth marketing at its finest.
  • Media: A radio station (or even a TV station) can geo-fence a competitor’s concert or station event. You can reach soccer Mom’s at the mall on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.; or Dad’s on the well beaten path to Home Depot; or you an reach both in an office park in order to promote at work streaming… you can do all of that with geo targeting.
  • Restaurant: Rather than do multiple deals with hotels and attractions in your area to appear in their collateral material or on TV screens in their guest rooms, now you can blanket an area within a mile radius of your business on a mobile phone, PC or tablet. Again, right prospect, right place and right time.
  • Convention and Visitors: If you need to hit all of the chemical engineers that are in town for CHEMFAB in order to sell your product or to pitch them to move their headquarters to Your Town, USA, you can do that by geo fencing the convention center and hotels.
  • Sports Teams/Hotels: Let’s say the Phillies are scheduled for InterLeague play in Baltimore next week (and it’s almost time for that, right?,)…. you can promote those games and the peripheral activities scheduled in Baltimore NEXT week to sports fans in the geographic environs of the Philadelphia ballpark THIS week?
  • Lobbying: If you need to raise awareness for your cause in Washington, DC or in your State Capitol, you can use geo targeting to blanket the area of Capitol Hill, Annapolis or Harrisburg in the week leading up to the vote. The DNC or the RNC coming to town? Blanket the convention center and the hotels.

Having the right tool for the right job is a luxury. Use geo targeting and geo fencing and treat yourself to some of that!  We’ll be exploring specific ways to apply geo targeting to each of these categories in the coming weeks so check back often. See you then!

Continue reading Duct Tape and Paper Clips